Posts tagged ‘black and white’
randygrskovic:

Sleeping Beauty | Randy Grskovic
This is a hand cut collage from prints of original negatives that i’ve collected. The young woman in the casket is printed from a 35mm camera circa 1950’s. The plastic flowers are from a 4” x 5” film from the 1940’s. An element in this collage is the quality of the prints, dictated by the physical media. The young woman is grainy while the plastic flowers are crystal clear. The flowers are professionally lit and shot in a studio while the image of the woman was taken by a presumed amatuer trying document an important memory. This memory is somehow plasticised in the physical film. I there are a lot of conversations could arise from these pairings.
Death often plays a very prominent roll in my artwork. I can’t help but be attracted to it. For me, it is a shared commonality for all life, and I think it is important for us to address it. 

"From my rotting body, flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity." - Edvard Munch 

randygrskovic:

Sleeping Beauty | Randy Grskovic

This is a hand cut collage from prints of original negatives that i’ve collected. The young woman in the casket is printed from a 35mm camera circa 1950’s. The plastic flowers are from a 4” x 5” film from the 1940’s. An element in this collage is the quality of the prints, dictated by the physical media. The young woman is grainy while the plastic flowers are crystal clear. The flowers are professionally lit and shot in a studio while the image of the woman was taken by a presumed amatuer trying document an important memory. This memory is somehow plasticised in the physical film. I there are a lot of conversations could arise from these pairings.

Death often plays a very prominent roll in my artwork. I can’t help but be attracted to it. For me, it is a shared commonality for all life, and I think it is important for us to address it. 

"From my rotting body, flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity." - Edvard Munch 

odditiesoflife:

The Glass Woman, 1935

Claimed to be the first exhibit of its type, a life-sized anatomically correct human figure with transparent “skin”. The model has detailed visible internal features and is internally illuminated. It created a sensation when first displayed and inspired many copies and imitations. The “glass” is actually Cellon, an early type of cellulose-based plastic. Cellon was also used during World War I when Germany experimented with “transparent” aircraft.

The original Gläserne Frau is still on display at the German Hygiene Museum, Dresden - Central Institute of Medical Education.

source 1, 2

(via odditiesoflife)